Case Studies

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Crafting a strategy for delivering financial info to users across a broad socio-economic range.

  • Platform: Website
  • Method: In-Person UX Interviews w/ pre-research journals
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Redesigning the digital toolkit for financial advisors at a large investment bank.

  • Platform: Website and intranet
  • Method: Remote & In-person UX Testing
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A Nationwide Restaurant Chain Optimizes Mobile Ordering App Before Rollout

  • Platform: Mobile
  • Method: In-Person UX Testing, Homework Assignment
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Creating a UX testing process and training a team to interview at a small game developer

  • Platform: Mobile, Tablet, Website
  • Method: In-House UX ResearchTraining
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Designing a tool to guide and support home-buyers early in the purchasing process. 

  • Platform: Mobile
  • Method: In-Person UX Testing, Card Sort Tool
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Assessing reactions and identifying the value proposition of a new 3D printer geared to professionals.

  • Platform: Mobile, Website
  • Method: In-person UX Testing
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Crafting a strategy for delivering financial info to a broad socio-economic range of users. 

In-Person UX Testing w/ pre-research journals.

 

The Challenge

A major retail bank was in the process of updating a site designed to provide financial information and education to a wide variety of users, from affluent to lower income households.

First, they needed to understand how their existing site met the needs of their diverse audience of users.

After an expansive redesign, they needed to validate that the new site was intuitive and appealing to users and that it met the varying needs of their multiple audiences.

The Approach

The project was conducted in two phases, each with a different set of participants:

  • Phase One focused on reactions to the existing website. Crosswalk conducted one-hour in-depth interviews in which participants reacted to the existing live site. They were given a series of tasks designed to uncover issues related to navigation and relevance of content.
  • Phase Two consisted of two parts: a self-paced journal assignment followed by a one-hour in-depth interview.

The journal assignment used open-ended queries to explore financial needs, struggles, and aspirations. Half of the participants also visited the newly designed site in order to give feedback.

The in-person interview was an in-depth exploration of the site, with an emphasis on the overall user experience. For half of participants, the interview was their first exposure to the site.

The Outcome

Both phases of the research enabled the site to realize its potential as a valued resource for individuals and families. The research identified, and later optimized, a range of features, functionality, and content delivery approaches.

The research led directly to the creation of an alternative browsing mechanism for various forms of content. This approach allowed users to search for and view information arranged for relevance to their individual needs as well as situation (mobile, at work, etc.).

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Redesigning the digital toolkit for financial advisors at a large investment bank.  

Remote and in-person moderated IDIs. 

The Challenge

A global wealth management firm, was in the midst of redesigning an internal tool to be utilized by both Senior Financial Advisors and dedicated support staff. The tool was a radical, but needed, redesign that incorporated next generation functionality to guide and support users in their daily tasks. The firm needed to understand whether users were comfortable with the shift and, if not, how to adjust the proposed tool.

The Approach

Crosswalk conducted a series of remote, moderated interviews with users: Financial Advisors and Client Associates.

The interviews included a set of taxonomy exercises in which users categorized a series of service needs according to perceived priority level and organization logic.

Users were also asked to comment on the functionality of the currently existing tools in contrast to a prototype of the proposed new tool.

The Outcome

The research identified major UX barriers to the adoption of the proposed tool. Crosswalk suggested a number of adjustments based upon Gestalt principles that would facilitate navigation of the tool by streamlining the presentation and organization of information and services.

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Optimizing a food and beverage ordering app for a national restaurant chain. 

In-Person mobile app testing preceeded by self-paced journals 

The Challenge

A nationwide restaurant chain, with a focus on coffee and baked goods, was preparing the nationwide launch of a mobile app that would allow users to place orders from their phone and later pick them up in store.

The app was being beta tested in a single market. Prior to the national launch, the chain wanted to identify any undiscovered barriers for users.

The Approach

Crosswalk conducted a two-phase research project: self-reported journaling followed by in-person interviews.

For the journal portion, participants in the beta market were tasked to download the app, add funds, purchase an order remotely through the app, and pick up the order in store. They journaled the experience, highlighting areas of confusion and satisfaction.

During the in-person session, the participants retraced their steps signing for and using the app, highlighting pain points and areas of delight in the process. The in-depth interviews also allowed for an exploration of finer features and functionality within the app.

The Outcome

The research identified the additional changes required before launch to the nomenclature and labeling of the new ordering capabilities on the app. The language and layout that had been migrated from the previous version of the app became confusing with the addition of the new functionalities, namely the newly bifurcated order and pickup experience. Edited video clips were provided to further highlight this discovery.

The research identified needed language and layout changes, providing guidance that acts as a "style guide" for future updates. Changes were implemented and the app was launched with success.

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Creating a UX testing process and training a team to interview at a small game developer

Onsite UX testing that acted as team training sessions 

The Challenge

A game development company wanted their internal staff to conduct continuous weekly user experience interviews with game players on a variety of platforms.

As their design team did not have experience as UX researchers, they needed guidance and training regarding project design, recruiting, interviewing, and the presentation of findings.

The Approach

Crosswalk met with key team members and crafted a 4-week consulting plan. The plan included templates for project scheduling, recruiting, discussion guides, and reports.

Crosswalk also conducted UX interviewing training sessions with the client. During a transitional period of a few weeks, the trained staff began to moderate their own UX interviews, while still under Crosswalk supervision.

The Outcome

Crosswalk's guidance and training in UX research methods positioned the firm to conduct their own independent UX testing on tablets and desktops.

The ability to conduct in-house research allowed the client to accelerate the iterative process, reducing time to market and improving the overall experience of game players.

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A Major Property and Casualty Insurance Firm Needs to Connect to Potential Home Buyers

In-Person UX Testing with card sorting tools to identify feature sets 

The Challenge

A major property and casualty insurance firm wanted to develop technology that would allow them to build relationships with home-buyers at an earlier point in the purchasing process.

They needed to assess reactions to a number of early-stage concepts designed for both new and experienced home shoppers. As they planned to iterate, their research goals were both to validate existing concepts and to generate and explore future concepts.

The Outcome

The research validated and optimized several concepts which resonated with users on an emotional level. The research also led to a reduction in the overall scope of the initiative, as several features were either considered extraneous or outside of the "permission zone" of the firm behind the app.

The more streamlined and focused app launched successfully and helped home-buyers navigate the often confusing process of home buying.

The Outcome

The research identified major UX barriers to the adoption of the proposed tool. Crosswalk suggested a number of adjustments based upon Gestalt principles that would facilitate navigation of the tool by streamlining the presentation and organization of information and services.

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Assessing reactions and identifying the value proposition of a new 3D printer geared to professionals. 

In-person IDIs, dyads, and triads with professionals

The Challenge

A leading 3D printing firm needed to assess user reactions to a new professionally focused 3D printer prior to launch. In addition, they were in the process of updating their marketing materials to highlight the features of their varied products, spanning professional, educational, and home use.

The Approach

Crosswalk conducted a series of in-person individual interviews as well as dyads and triads with coworkers.

Recruiting targeted professional groups who were currently using 3D printing or would benefit from adding this functionality to their set of tools. We spoke with architects, engineers, and other scientists.

In addition, participants later completed post-research surveys that built upon findings unearthed during interviews.

The Outcome

The research findings highlighted the users' main perceived benefits provided by the MakerBot 3D printers: the printer's functionality as well as the positive impact on workflows within the offices using the tools.

Following our recommendations, the user-facing website was updated to highlight this broader range of benefits beyond the performance of the printers themselves. In addition, the post-research questionnaire was used to help identify the specific types of images that would communicate the printers' scale and level of detail to potential clients viewing the website and other marketing materials.

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